Tag Archives: tech


The Sticker Wars: WeChat’s creatives go up against Line

ICYMI, the background for this story:

  • “Line” is a chat app for iOS/Android.
  • It’s from Japan.
  • It sells different sets of stickers, well-illustrated emoticons.
  • Line is probably the first chat app to find a booming revenue model. (See TNW.)
  • Other chat apps (WeChat, KakaoTalk, Kik) have caught on and have quickly implemented their own version of stickers.

In this feature on 88 Bar, we analyze Line’s sticker success and look at how China’s WeChat has caught up.

 

The incumbent: Line

Line’s core line of stickers is quite something. Cute characters, stark expressions, and plenty of comical situations that are just vague enough to apply to whatever situation might come up in a conversation. (It really works; I’ve bought nine sticker sets to date myself on top of a dozen or so free ones.)

They are also distinctly Japanese – the art style is very clean; people and creatures have large heads; the expressions are based on Japanese manga conventions…

bd236e64

But most importantly, the most popular stickers, which involves the love story between a bear and and a bunny, mirror stereotypical (East Asian) male-female relationship dynamics:

linestickers2

Note the stoic male character versus the shopaholic and emotionally effusive female character.

Not only has Line created a great set of their own stickers, but they’ve managed to rope in some of Japan’s most popular cartoon characters – Hello Kitty, Doraemon, Dragonball – as well as some from America – Spongebob SquarePants, Donald Duck, Snoopy. Line also runs many time-limited promotions; their “Pray for the Philippines” stickers,  following the recent devastating typhoon was pure genius (it even donated the proceeds to a charity!).

 

WeChat

At first, it seemed that WeChat’s sole innovation with its stickers system was that they were animated. My favorite example is that when they launched, they had already licensed the now Turner-owned Tuzki line of emoticons that were all the rage on the Chinese internet (albeit 5-10 years ago).

Editor’s note: Please note all animations below have been reproduced by hand as GIFs. The actual stickers contain smoother animations than what we’ve depicted below.

Tuzki

Tuzki

But aside from Tuzki, their initial sticker packs felt somewhat weaker. Some resembled Line’s Japanese creations but without the punch:

Nervous Boy by Caerux

Nervous Boy by Caerux

While others had a flat, commercial personality:

DADA by 2SPOT

DADA by 2SPOT

More importantly, these sticker sets did not capture the nuanced emotions and complex backstories that are the hallmark of a Line sticker and that make it a great conversational lubricant.

But recently WeChat’s stickers have started to develop a style of its own. The recent sticker packs are great not because they try to mimic the polished, “Hello Kitty” style from Line; they succeed because they’re whacky, weird and funny in their own way. There’s a very Chinese flavor to them; the grainy lines, absurd sense of humor and adult style all remind me of the kind of illustration and design coming out of China today.

Frog and Horse by XiaoYaoJi

Frog and Horse by XiaoYaoJi

What’s interesting is that the stickers themselves aren’t always created in Mainland China; many are from Hong Kong (Old Girl, Fatina, AH FEI@GAL), Taiwan (Sinkcomic) and even their Japanese acquisitions aren’t as clean and cute as the Line products.

WeChatAHFEIGAL

AH FEI@GAL by Graphic Airlines

It’s still too early to tell whether WeChat’s sticker system will continue to evolve. But as it stands, it’s already catching up to Line, and jumping ahead of its competitors (Kik and KakaoTalk both had relatively immature sticker systems, with only a handful of sticker sets or with no free stickers respectively).

Stats: The kinds of tech startups in HK

Last month, my friend Paul Orlando and I launched Startup Hug*, an experiment in cultivating an early adopter community here in Hong Kong. As part of the process, we evaluated over 130 local startup websites (the list came from Paul’s We Are HK Tech). One side product is that we categorized and annotated this list of 130.

While the data is still up to date, I wanted to share some of the statistics that we found – though do keep in mind the margin of error as this has been one night’s work:

HK startup types
Additional notes:

  • While games only made up 6% of the startups, they actually represent a relatively mature sector here.
  • I was surprised by the number of content startups, given the relative dearth of a reading-blogging culture locally.
  • Only 14% of startups offered (physical) goods, of which only a handful were genuine hardware startups. This seems low given Hong Kong’s proximity to Shenzhen and history of toy/clothing manufacturing.
  • 45 startups (35%) offered free (or freemium) products/services.
  • Productivity tools were nowhere to be found.
  • China-targeting startups were rare (probably less than 10%), which either speaks to the difficulty of doing that from Hong Kong or a lack of trying.

Want to find out more? See the four startups we chose to feature on Startup Hug or see the updated list of startups at We Are HK Tech.

* Disclaimer: Shameless plug.